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Archive for the ‘Motorcycle Maintenance’ Category

Clymer Updates Coverage for Yamaha Royal Star Now Covering 1996-2013

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Clymer has just updated their coverage of Yamaha Royal Star now covering all models from 1996-2013. Part number M374-2.

This print manual is an in-depth look at the motorcycle, with over 400 pages of technical information, illustrations, and photos. It has everything you’ve come to expect from Clymer manuals, including basic maintenance information, a trouble shooting guide, and a detailed look at each of the bike’s systems.

Armed with step-by-step directions, you can do all sorts of repairs yourself or rebuild a bike from the inside out. As with all our manuals, you can complete most tasks using common tools and we offer plenty of workarounds to make each fix as simple as possible.… Read the rest

Clymer Releases New Manual for Suzuki DL650 V-Strom

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Clymer has just released a new manual for the Suzuki DL650 V-Strom. It covers model years 2004-2011.

This print manual is an in-depth look at the motorcycle, with over 400 pages of technical information, illustrations, and photos. It has everything you’ve come to expect from Clymer manuals, including basic maintenance information, a trouble shooting guide, and a detailed look at each of the bike’s systems.

Armed with step-by-step directions, you can do all sorts of repairs yourself or rebuild a bike from the inside out. As with all our manuals, you can complete most tasks using common tools and we offer plenty of workaround to make each fix as simple as possible.… Read the rest

8 Reasons You Need A Clymer Manual

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Some enthusiast riders visit a mechanic every time their motorcycle needs service. That’s okay, but not for everyone. Motorcycle mechanics can charge a premium cost for simple maintenance anyone can do. There is also a time penalty involved in having to locate a place that works on your old and rare BMW/Ducati/Triumph or whatever you ride. For the DIY motorcycle enthusiast, here is a good look at why a Clymer manual can be the best tool in your toolbox.

 

1.    Written from Experience

Every Clymer manual is written during a complete tear down and rebuild of the entire motorcycle. Each manual is specifically made just for that specific make and model of motorcycle.… Read the rest

Winterize Your Motorcycle

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Not everyone can live in sunny LA or Miami year round. While those cities enjoy riding weather in December and January, some of our readers will only be cranking up the snow blower. If you are putting your bike up for the winter, there are a few things you should know if this is your first time. A little bit of work now will make next spring’s riding season a lot easier.

First off, find a storage location. While your first thought might be your bedroom, your spouse might not appreciate that (if they do, treasure them). The second best location then would be a climate controlled garage.… Read the rest

Make a Motorcycle Maintenance Schedule

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Modern motorcycles are precision machines that are a blast to ride, but they require regular maintenance. Well maintained machines are more reliable, and safer. A maintenance schedule will result in a ride that doesn’t break down halfway through riding season, and will have a longer life and higher resale value.

Here is a suggested schedule to get you started.

Consult the manual.  The motorcycle manufacturer knows your bike better than you do, so check the manual for recommended maintenance intervals. If you do not have your manual, you can get usually get one online as a PDF download.

Follow break-in procedures.  Obviously this only applies to new bikes.… Read the rest

Getting Your Motorcycle Ready for the Road

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Spring is here! After that terrible winter, it’s finally time to start riding again. If you have neglected your motorcycle during the winter (Understandable. Who likes working on freezing cold metal?), then it’s time for some necessary maintenance before you can fire up.

Don’t worry, this should be easy enough for anyone with a basic understanding of motorcycles. Follow this list and we’ll have you blasting down the road in no time.

Electrical Check the battery charge with a voltmeter. It should test around the 12.5V area. Charge it on a trickle charger if it reads low. Check the terminals for corrosion.… Read the rest